The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Adventures in European Filmmaking #45
The Gunslinger Guide to Julie Christie #25

francisjulie
Today's Adventure: François Truffaut and Julie Christie share a bottle of wine on the set of Fahrenheit 451 (1966).

9 comments :

Sock MonKey 1 said...

Maybe the wine explains how such a poor film came from all that talent.

Marc said...

where's oskar? or were they trying to keep him away from the bottle?

Chip Hilton said...

Leaving this here in hopes you'll read it instead of back in June where it belongs (under a glorious shot of Natalie Wood). Last month, you mentioned the declining number of comments and several people hopped on to assure you that your site was still of great importance to them. I'd like to add my voice to that sentiment. This is a marvelous place to visit, with images that move me greatly. Please know how highly you're valued.

Tom Sutpen said...

Sock MonKey 1:

'Fahrenheit 451' is seriously flawed, but I don't think it's a poor film at all. Matter'a fact, in many ways it's the most autobiographical film of Truffaut's career (substitute Cinema in place of literature and you have nothing less than the psychological landscape of Truffaut's adolescence).

Mark:

I think he was trying to keep Oskar away, period. Story goes that Werner had become not only an international star, but a major league 'prima donna' in the five years between 'Jules et Jim' and 'Fahrenheit'; consequently the two did not get along on that picture.

Chip:

I thanks you for your kind words, but I was only (and admittedly) whining about our overall decline in visitors, not comments. The visitor stats have actually picked up a bit since that time.

Sock MonKey 1 said...

Tom,
I'll accept your judgment on Fahrenheit 451, I never watched it a second time.

On another matter, I'm a daily visitor and I try to tell others about this great site. Thanks.

MichaelRyerson said...

For what it's worth, I visit at least once a day, every day, and view every image you post. And I comment when my warped sense of humor isn't acting up.

Lex10 said...

Now DAT'S film makin'!

MichaelRyerson said...

Film-making seems like a very complicated way to get girls. But, of course, the secret to getting girls is to pretend to be intensely interested in something else and if you've played your cards right, they let their guard down and sit on a curb and drink wine with you.

marietta said...

And dont forget in "Jules e Jim" the wunderbare Oskar Werner.