The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

When Legends Gather #587

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Original caption:

"Patton" producer Frank McCarthy, center, holds two Oscars, for best film and best actor, on April 16, 1971. Left to right: Karl Malden, who played General Bradley and accepted the award for director Frank Schaffner, with Goldie Hawn, Steve McQueen, and Jeanne Moreau.

7 comments :

Robert Fiore said...

Geez, nobody wanted to pick up his own award for that picture.

Greg said...

Yes, George C. Scott famously declined his Oscar but it was delivered to him and less famously, he never returned it. So...

FlynnD said...

I'll admit I'm projecting... but I'm hoping Steve and Jeanne got it on.

Timmy said...

Was McQueen there for "Towering Inferno"? Probably one of his worse flick...

Fred said...

This was 3 years before the Oscars threw credibility out the window and gave Fred Astaire a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for looking good in a tux before getting drenched next to Gregory Sierra in Towering Inferno.

Greg said...

Fred, it's true Astaire was nominated but rest assured, Robert DeNiro won for the role of the young Vito Corleone in The Godfather, Part II.

TIM said...

This was one of President Richard Nixon's favorite films. He had his own print, and would often watch it in the White House, particularly before having to make an important military decisions in Vietnam and Cambodia.