Adventures in the Vast Wasteland #8


Today's adventure: Mary Ford and Les Paul rehearse under the lights for their imaginatively titled hit show, The Les Paul & Mary Ford Show, also shown in certain markets as Les Paul & Mary Ford at Home. Of course, the immense talents of Les and Mary precluded the need for a catchy title.

12 comments:

peterrocker said...

Immense Talents is almost an understatement. Will there ever be a better version of "How High The Moon"?

Greg said...

No, never. I've heard a few different versions and they never even come close to the original.

Duroc said...

That "Les Paul" kicks butts!

Fred said...

I wonder if Les and Mary ever imagined that in a dozen short years guys like Jimmy and Eric would be shredding away on those nice little guitars they're holding?

Saint Russell said...

I like the Seeburg M100 (W?) as well.

Greg said...

It's beautiful isn't it?

Brooks said...

Les was about 5x as fast on the frets as either of them and far better versed in theory and technique. But I imagine he saw amp distortion as something to eliminate and bluesmen as primitive.

Greg said...

I agree that Les was a better guitarist than Hendrix or Page or Clapton but he did some great blues guitar himself in the thirties. In fact, most people would be surprised at how expansive his playing was: Country, Blues, Jazz, Rock, Pop. Pretty much everything except Classical but I'm sure he could've handled that just fine if he'd wanted to. He and his idol, Django Rheinhardt, were two of the most talented men to ever pick up a six string.

swac said...

It's worth tracking down their radio shows as well. I like the one where Les invents a gas powered guitar, but he uses laughing gas by mistake and has some sort of psychedelic episode (and this was in the mid-50s).

Greg said...

That sounds like a must-see. I have to find some of these, I've only ever seen short clips from them.

Andy 7 said...

Greatest version of "In The Good Old Summertime" ever.

slogans7 said...

Amazing tone they both got from those solid bodies, particularly when you consider their guitars weren't plugged in.