The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Seminal Image Friday #1:
Frames Within the Frame (Part One)


Gold Diggers of 1933
(Mervyn LeRoy, Busby Berkeley; 1933)


Help!
(Richard Lester; 1965)


Qui êtes-vous, Polly Maggoo?
(Who Are You, Polly Magoo?)
(William Klein; 1966)


Stakeout on Dope Street
(Irvin Kershner; 1958)


Hapax Legomena I: Nostalgia
(Hollis Frampton; 1971)


Alice in Wonderland
(Jonathan Miller; 1966)


Playtime
(Jacques Tati; 1967)


Catch-22
(Mike Nichols; 1970)


Un Bounty killer a Trinità
(A Bounty Killer for Trinity)
(Oscar Santiello, Joe D'Amato; 1972)


The Sand Pebbles
(Robert Wise; 1966)


La môme
(The Little Girl)
(Olivier Dahan; 2007)


Yukinojo henge
(An Actor's Revenge)
(Kon Ichikawa; 1963)


This is England
(Shane Meadows; 2006)


Whity
(Rainer Werner Fassbinder; 1971)


Days of Heaven
(Terence Malick; 1978)


Control
(Anton Corbijn; 2007)


Dog Day Afternoon
(Sidney Lumet; 1975)


Body Snatchers
(Abel Ferrara; 1993)


Nel nome del padre
(In the Name of the Father)
(Marco Bellocchio; 1972)


Brazil
(Terry Gilliam; 1985)


Bonnie and Clyde
(Arthur Penn; 1967)


L'oeil du malin
(The Third Lover)
(Claude Chabrol; 1962)


Blow Up
(Michelangelo Antonioni; 1966)


Invasion of the Body Snatchers
(Don Siegel; 1956)


Les fruits de la passion
(Fruits of Passion)
(Shuji Terayama; 1981)

Annals of Crime #76


Original Caption:

San Francisco -- Rebecca Moscone, 18, is consoled by friends at the Moscone home here, after learning that her father, San Francisco Mayor George Moscone, and Supervisor Harvey Milk had been shot and killed at City Hall (1978)

This Week's Sargent #13


Venetian Glass Workers (1880)

S is for Steichen #14


Walt Disney

The Art of the Panel: Marvel #13


from How Can I Love a Member of the Establishment?
(by Stan Lee, Don Heck and John Verpoorten)
(My Love #5; May, 1970)

When Legends Gather #539


Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rossellini and Federico Fellini

The Art of Cinema #406


The Boy with Green Hair
(Joseph Losey; 1948)

Norman Rockwell Saved from Drowning #8


University Club (1960)

Mop Tops in Action #15


The Mop Tops foreshadow

Seminal Image #952


Le scarabée d'or
(The Golden Beetle)
(Segundo de Chomón; 1907)

The Art of the Panel: DC #16


from Ordeal By Fire
(by Jack Miller and Joe Certa)
(Detective Comics #239; January, 1957)

The Art of the Centerfold #51


Dinah Willis (Miss December, 1965)

Signs and Meaning in Cinema #31


Signs: The Cat Burglar
(William Witney; 1961)

Shutterbugs #6


Tazio Secchiaroli

They Were Collaborators #584


Otto Preminger and Billy Wilder

The Fair: Peace Through Understanding #5


Original Caption:

New York -- Members of the Russian Moisevev Ballet Company perform one of their vigorous numbers high above the New York World's Fair, during their visit to the New York State Tower. Vasili Savin tries a few steps on the railing, while Nina Mikhailova and Natolia Bobeova prefer to play it safe below him. The 110-member Moisyev Company returns to Moscow at the conclusion of the current engagement at Madison Square Garden. (1965)

What's Up With the Updates?

Frequent, long term visitors to this blog no doubt have noticed that we here at Gunslinger endeavor to update this blog every day. Granted, there is no mandate to do so; no requirement from without; and I'm certain a vast number of people would prefer that it not be updated at all. But since I have nothing more . . . substantive to offer our visitors in its stead, the inner compulsion to accumulate entries is perhaps greater than it otherwise would be.

This, in case you were wondering, is my roundabout way of apologizing for the absence of new content; particularly in the last two days. I wish I could tell you that my hands had been smashed to oatmeal, thus hampering me physically. In truth, I can only say that events in the last few days have conspired to incinerate both my will and my energy. It is the only excuse I have, but it has the added benefit of being true. Call it burnout; call it what you will. I just ain't got it in me at the moment; though I'm sure before long I'll snap back into the delusional mindset that, despite everything, keeps me running this thing like five-handed clockwork.

That is all

Men of the West #37


Andy Devine

Seminal Image #951


The Trigger Effect
(David Koepp; 1996)

This Week's Weegee #63

The Art of Jazz #98


Vince Guaraldi Trio
(Fantasy Records; 1956)

Artists in Action #515


Fred Allen wrestles with technology

The Present Day Composer #79


Bob Marley (1945-1981)

The Gunslinger Guide to Julie Christie #6

Tricky: Scenes from a Life #86


Reliving the glory days of the Hiss Case, Tricky examines imaginary
microfilm in public (1958)

The Art of Cinema #405


Watermelon Man
(Melvin Van Peebles; 1970)

Ziegfeld Girls #16


Original Caption:

Heat Drives Follies Girls to Roof for Rehearsals.

New York -- Pearl Eaton, Marie Wallace and Leonore Baron, members of the Ziegfeld Follies Company, give pedestrians on the streets below a couple of eyes-full while they go through their daily rehearsals on the roof of the New Amsterdam Theater. The extreme heat made it necessary for the girls to be put through their paces in the open. (1922)