The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Before and After #207: Otto Preminger

Before


After

7 comments :

David Wise said...

Apparently he really liked that suit!

estiv said...

A few decades in America can do that to you.

Fred said...

David, if you wait long enough, all suits come back into style eventually.

Kreisler said...

The terroriser - Faye Dunaway described him as an explosive, mad dog.

slyboots2 said...

Like Faye Dunaway has a lot of room to talk? She sounds scary.

Tommy O'C said...

He was a tyrant on the set, although I doubt that was the case when he worked with that Sinatra guy. Word is that Billy Wilder cast Ludwig (as Sinatz dubbed him) as the commandant in "Stalag 17" not because of his acting ability (contrary to what the notoriously vain Preminger chose to believe) but because he had such a tyrannical temperament. Just another of Wilder's inspired little casting jests.

swac said...

Ah, the great Otto Pebblejar.