The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Adventures in American Filmmaking #123

jamekinski
Today's Adventure: On the set of Love & Money director James Toback consults with his star (1982).

4 comments :

Dan said...

Picked up a VHS of this not too long ago but have not had a chance to watch it yet. Need to track Toback down for the book.

Kimberly Lindbergs said...

I've been seeing James Toback's name mentioned a lot lately since his newest film (the Tyson doc) has been getting good press. I suspect I might like Tyson a bit more than Love & Money, which I didn't care for too much when I saw it back in the late '80s or early '90s.

Robert Fiore said...

God, doesn't Toback look like someone who's about to get a knuckle sandwich!

Tom Sutpen said...

Apart from being King Vidor's debut (and swan-song) as an actor, Love & Money is semi-legendary as the only film Pauline Kael had any involvement in during her ill-fated Production deal with Paramount in 1979. Word had it that Warren Beatty . . . who was Executive Producer on this film (until he saw it) . . . flat-out fired her as nominal Producer after James Toback issued an 'either she goes, or I go' ultimatum six weeks after she got the gig.

It didn't help that Kael had spent much of her time at Paramount imploring Beatty . . . and everyone at the studio . . . not to make Reds.

Word onna street also had it that the whole Production deal was Beatty's elaborate, byzantine plot to humiliate Kael in the eyes of all Hollywood after her rather stinging New Yorker review of Heaven Can Wait the year before.

Anything's possible.