The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Broadcasters #72


Gordon McLendon

4 comments :

estiv said...

The Old Scotsman -- I remember listening to his right-wing rants on the radio. He funded the movies "Giant Gila Monster" and "Killer Shrews," in the latter of which he had a small part as an assistant mad scientist with coke-bottle eyeglasses who dies in the laboratory.

Christopher said...

brought movie making to texas..Killer Shrews..Giant Gila Monster..I used to go to his Gemini Drive-in here in Dallas in the early 70s..

Timmy said...

Well, there was a man named Gordon McLendon (note the spelling...) who was a huge AM radio programming genius in Texas, in the late 50's & early 60's. And he did run KLIF in Dallas. But, I don't know about all that movie-stuff part of his life...

Tom Sutpen said...

You were right about the spelling (my bad, there), but it's the same guy. The Old Scotsman had his fingers in a wealth (literally) of diversified pies all over the Lone Star state; only one of which was film production (Killer Shrews and Giant Gila Monster were both shot in Texas). He was a major shareholder in Columbia Pictures and, I believe, did some kind of production work at United Artists. In later years, he was one of the producers on John Huston's Victory.

I thought of McLendon simply because one of his stations, KABL-AM in Oakland, was instrumental in the development of so-called Easy Listening music as a radio format; and it's a peripheral subject of some thing I'm writing for this blog.