The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Shutterbug Friday #2:
England Swings . . . Kurt Hutton is There!

Among those artists who joined the exodus out of Germany once it became clear that the National Socialists weren't kidding was the soon-to-be eminent photojournalist Kurt Hutton. In 1938 he signed on to the staff of Picture Post, Britain's answer to the American weeklies Life and Look. Here is a sampling of his work, focused exclusively on life in Britain, such as it was, from the late 1930s to the mid 1950s.

















































15 comments :

Mademoiselle C. said...

All those pictures have some magic in them, the magic of the past.

Thanks for sharing!

Vanwall said...

Wow! A lovely series, with some interesting subject matter - the dolls and mannequins are wonderfully suggestive. The pub shot, 6th from the bottom, is a kind of masterpiece,

justjack said...

"The pub shot, 6th from the bottom, is a kind of masterpiece"

Yes it is; that's the picture that caused me to linger for a very long time. It's so well ordered (the composition, the people, and the various grids in the walls and window), and yet so vibrant, so full of life, and so very deep, too; the world of that photo, extending as it does well beyond the exterior window, is jammed with life.

I want to jump into that picture. It makes me feel the way the last panel of an Asterix comic always does, when the entire village is having its joyous feast under the stars. I want to be with those people.

It Will Come to Me said...

Thank you for these wonderful photos. I'm of an age where they feel vaguely familiar (more so than things that happened last week as it happens).

Vanwall 2:31am.

I'm none too sure that the photo you take to be of a pub is shot in a pub. Firstly it would be very unlikely that there would have been a window of that size in a pub then (or now come to that). Also there are tea/coffee cups on the tables and what looks like a fairy cake which most certainly would not have figured in pub society in the '40s/'50s. I knew a publican in the '60s who when asked for a 'half of shandy' (beer mixed with lemonade) would retort "This is a public house not a bloody youth club"! I suspect the photo may have been shot in a tea room, on the other hand the bar stools would have been a bit of an anachronism. Come to that bar stools in pubs of that era would have been an anachronism too.

parallel-botany said...

wonderful images.

joel. said...

a fantastic series.
thank you

marietta said...

Die inbruenstick betenden kinder,in ihrer glaubhaftigkeit sind sehr beeindruckend.Um nur ein foto zu beurteilen,danke dafuer.

Fred said...

Every picture tells a story don't it?

Robert Fiore said...

That "Society of Individualists" image could have come straight out of a Boulting Brothers movie, and the one with the little kids praying across from Bobbie Gentry is priceless, but what really intrigues me is the one of the two women across from Joyce Grenfell. Would the then-illegal relationship I infer here be (a) obvious to the contemporary viewer of the picture, or (b) a matter of hiding in plain sight, or (c) just something I'm imagining through the lens of the present?

marietta said...

Viele werden sagen,"da brauche ich nur `ne Camera mit einem 50ziger Ojektiv oder einem 35ger und fotografiere drauf los,das kann ich auch überall mal reinschauen reingehen usw.Du hast es aber nicht gemacht.Er schon.Frueher war das die Arbeit und Aufgabe der Niederlischen Genremaler,Wirtshauscenen,und das übrige Alltaegliche.Eine großartige Arbeit und Vielfaetigkeit.Hut ab.

Kreisler said...

No 6 definitely isn't a pub. I think you're right with a tea room. I'd for somewhere like Harrogate catering for respectable Sunday outings.

Wellwynder said...

Outstanding selection of photos - very evocative. The 'pub' photo is definitely not a pub, but a tea-room, for all the reasons already rehearsed. Assuming this is the 1950s, the bar-stools would have been very trendy.

Max said...

The "Society of Individualists" followed by the doll mold gave me a chuckle. Excellent sequencing.

pal shazar said...

thank you many times over for these unforgettable images.

Testify said...

Would the then-illegal relationship I infer here be (a) obvious to the contemporary viewer of the picture, or (b) a matter of hiding in plain sight, or (c) just something I'm imagining through the lens of the present?

I think this is just a photo of friends. It should be noted however that lesbianism, whilst taboo, was never illegal in the UK. Male homosexuality was illegal. Apparently Queen Victoria simply refused to believe that female homosexuality existed and so it was never legislated against (though this is surely an apocryphal tale I know of no other reason for this anomaly).