The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Seminal Image Friday #1:
Frames Within the Frame (Part One)


Gold Diggers of 1933
(Mervyn LeRoy, Busby Berkeley; 1933)


Help!
(Richard Lester; 1965)


Qui êtes-vous, Polly Maggoo?
(Who Are You, Polly Magoo?)
(William Klein; 1966)


Stakeout on Dope Street
(Irvin Kershner; 1958)


Hapax Legomena I: Nostalgia
(Hollis Frampton; 1971)


Alice in Wonderland
(Jonathan Miller; 1966)


Playtime
(Jacques Tati; 1967)


Catch-22
(Mike Nichols; 1970)


Un Bounty killer a Trinità
(A Bounty Killer for Trinity)
(Oscar Santiello, Joe D'Amato; 1972)


The Sand Pebbles
(Robert Wise; 1966)


La môme
(The Little Girl)
(Olivier Dahan; 2007)


Yukinojo henge
(An Actor's Revenge)
(Kon Ichikawa; 1963)


This is England
(Shane Meadows; 2006)


Whity
(Rainer Werner Fassbinder; 1971)


Days of Heaven
(Terence Malick; 1978)


Control
(Anton Corbijn; 2007)


Dog Day Afternoon
(Sidney Lumet; 1975)


Body Snatchers
(Abel Ferrara; 1993)


Nel nome del padre
(In the Name of the Father)
(Marco Bellocchio; 1972)


Brazil
(Terry Gilliam; 1985)


Bonnie and Clyde
(Arthur Penn; 1967)


L'oeil du malin
(The Third Lover)
(Claude Chabrol; 1962)


Blow Up
(Michelangelo Antonioni; 1966)


Invasion of the Body Snatchers
(Don Siegel; 1956)


Les fruits de la passion
(Fruits of Passion)
(Shuji Terayama; 1981)

15 comments :

Vanwall said...

Wow! Awesomely brilliant! Shoulda had Hope Emerson walking from the back to the front of her dark office in "Cry of the City", but that's just me.

chainedandperfumed said...

Damn. And this coming from someone who just a few days ago was calling "burnout".

Andy Jukes said...

Great idea for a series. I love your site.

Robert Fiore said...

Another humdinger of a series. May the tour de force be with you.

Patrick Murtha said...

There is an amazing frame-within-a-frame image at 34:09 of Jess Franco's Venus in Furs (1969). Check it out.

H. P. L. said...

Only Sutpen can put D'Amato, Wise and Chabrol in the same post.

Ryland Walker Knight said...

Pretty durned fabulous, as ever.

Kreisler said...

Spectacular - thanks

Sly Syl said...

Didnt they kill in actual animal in that Nel Nome del Padre scene?

Woody said...

Tom, you've outdone yourself. Bravo, Sir.

Christopher said...

lol..alright..bounty killer for trinity..i actually have that on dvd-r

notanotherblog said...

Golddiggers of 1933! Awesome stuff!

Dennis Cozzalio said...

This is spectacular, Tom! What a wonderful idea. I'm thinking maybe a whole chapter devoted to De Palma! "****! A must-see!"

loosefocus said...

beautiful

jim emerson said...

Beauty!