The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Seminal Image #936


Jackie Brown
(Quentin Tarantino; 1997)

9 comments :

Rhys Ziemba said...

His best film by far. I was delighted the other day when reading the liner notes to Bobby Womack's "Understanding" to learn that Ms. Grier is credited with background vocals (presumably on Harry Hippie)...Soul Stirrer?

the communicatrix said...

I'm with Rhys--head and shoulders above Tarantino's other pictures, and possibly one of the top 20 American films of the last century. Well, on my list. Such a great snapshot of time and place.

F.G. Marshall-Stacks said...

I dont think of it as Tarantinos - I think of it as ELMORE LEONARDS.
GOD I LOVE HIS STYLE.

Vanwall said...

Grier and Forster, brought back from virtual obscurity, were terrific, with wonderful chemistry, and I have to say, it was their picture, not the director's.

Maureen said...

Ditto, ditto and ditto, I've seen it at least 6 times and it just gets better and better.

Dr. Mystery said...

I'm not a rabid Tarantino fanboy although I like all his movies, but I do think it's funny that the writers of the other comments are going out of their way to place the success of the film in hands other than the director's. You people act like Tarantino just showed up to the set and ate a sandwich while the movie magically came together thanks to the book it was adapted from. Yes, Leonard and Forster and Grier played a huge role in its success, but Tarantino made the casting, aesthetic, and formal decisions that resulted in this film whether you're willing to admit it or not.

Vanwall said...

It was ham on rye.

Tommy O'C said...

Among Tarantino films, I’d put it second only to Pulp Fiction. With all due respect to Elmore Leonard, Jackie Brown is a departure from the novel it’s based on, Rum Punch, which in some ways is better than the movie, in other ways not. Maybe 70% of the movie's best lines (and Tarantino movies sport some of the hippest dialogue around) were not taken from the novel. And, reading the novel, you do miss that repartee. On the other hand, I can still watch the movie and not say, oh, this was better done in the novel. Meaning that the lion's share of the credit for Jackie Brown does not belong to Elmore Leonard.

Ann oDyne said...

if Quentin had written all the 'Dutch' novels I loved, then I guess I would be crazy about him too.
He looks like Bob Hope.