When Legends Gather #522


Dusty Springfield and The Ronettes

13 comments:

Christopher said...

..just like Ronnie said..

The Gorn said...

I can practically smell the hairspray!

Kreisler said...

Dusty looks kind of anxious...

Rhys Ziemba said...

I don't think she ever came out, but Dusty was widely regarded as a sapphist. She sure sounds lonely to me.

Tom Sutpen said...

Dusty Springfield came close to acknowledging it in at least one instance that I know of (an interview where she was asked about her love life and said something along the lines of 'I love men and I love women. What's the big deal?', etc). But I recall reading that it was tolerably well known in the industry that she was what Winchell used to refer to as 'not the marrying kind'. How far that knowledge got out to the public at large, I can't say.

It didn't hurt her career any; and besides, if nothing else it gives her reading of songs like "Breakfast in Bed' a more, uh, stimulating dimension.

To these ears, anyway.

Tommy O'C said...

Dusty, we hardly knew ye.

Robert Fiore said...

She didn't come close, she acknowledged her orientation flat out later in life. See for instance the BBC documentary hosted by Dawn French and Jennifer Saunders. I would expect the apprehension here would have more to do with a white British soul singer meeting women who were not only the original article but probably idols of hers, rather than any sexual tension. If she'd even contemplated broaching the other subject she might have passed out.

Not that it will make a difference at this point, but originally "Johnny we hardly knew ye" referred to a returning soldier so maimed in battle as to be unrecognizable. The original song goes "You haven't an arm, you haven't a leg/And the enemy nearly slew ye/Now you'll have to go out on the streets and beg/Oh Johnny we hardly knew ye." Later sanitized for American consumption as "When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again."

swac said...

Dusty moved to Canada for a while to be away from prying eyes, and was involved with Carole Pope, from the Toronto new wave band Rough Trade in the early '80s, and from what I can gather it wasn't much of a secret (Pope writes about it in detail in her autobiography Anti Diva).

You can read a bit about it here.

Fred said...

swac, I can always count on you to revive old memories. I remember spinning Rough Trade cuts when I dj'd on college radio and parties back in the early to mid 80s. That was a band I'd almost all but forgotten, and for the life of me I can't remember any songs by them, although I do remember Carole Pope (who, as I recall, was a pretty striking brunette).

As for Dusty and the Ronettes, all I can say is that if they sang during this meeting, then it is a shame no one thought to record it (like the Beatles meet Elvis, but I guess that's a comment for the Mop Tops threads).

Gerard Saylor said...

What, no jokes about Phil Spector? My first thought was that Springfield was afraid of getting smacked or shot.

Shelby Lynne did a fine album of Springfield covers entitled Just A Little Lovin'

Tom Sutpen said...

Now, that it looks like he's going to the slam for life (and even if he gets the minimum . . . which he won't . . . at his age it's still a life sentence) any Phil Spector jokes would be piling on.

swac said...

Rough Trade, I think they were the first band to record a direct-to-disc release (their debut, which included the immortal Lipstick on Your Dipstick), but they later toned down the camp and had a few Canadian radio hits like High School Confidential (not the Jerry Lee Lewis song) which included "cream my jeans" in the lyrics, a milestone at the time.

Anne Bentley said...

second from right is Martha Reeves from Martha and the Vandellas - they were very big at the time and along with DS, not to be overlooked