The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Men of the West #36


Buck Jones

9 comments :

pinstripebindi said...

Didn't Bill Cosby have a bit about watching Buck Jones flicks back inna day? He always drank milk and his hat never came off??

Christopher said...

COOL!

F.G. Marshall-Stacks said...

GREAT photo, in several different ways.

What a Dick Tracy PROFILE.

Booksteve said...

Had a chance to see some of Buck's final films when I was a teen back in the late 70's and, along with Col. Tim McCoy, he quickly became a cowboy favorite.

Christopher said...

I love the old B's..they were the Spaghetti Westerns of their day..full of gadgets,quirks,larger than life characters,great music and violence..and just as addicting to those guillible enough to sit thru one or two..

Joe Thompson said...

Historian William K Everson said Buck Jones was one of the best actors among western stars. Thanks for remembering him.

Regards,
Joe Thompson ;0)

East Side said...

Buck Jones was my mom's favorite cowboy star!

swac said...

I've only seen one or two Buck Jones titles myself, but he had a very solid screen presence, and naturally ingrained cowboy skills from growing up on a ranch, and later as a Wild West Show member. It's a shame he died relatively young (50 years old, in the Coconut Grove fire in Boston in 1942), he probably would have graduated to interesting character roles a la Ben Johnson.

MichaelRyerson said...

Buck Jones and his wife, Odelle, built a beautiful Spanish-style house out on Magnolia Boulevard in the San Fernando Valley. When I was a kid we all knew where it was and drove by on week-end nights. He was long gone by then and his widow had had to sell the house. It was a private boys school by then. But he was still one of our heroes. Through the years we came to find out that the house had been designed to be virtually fire-proof as he had a life-long fear of being burned to death. The sad irony is, of course, he was lost in the Cocoanut Grove fire in Boston in 1942.