The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Ron Asheton dead at 60



Ron Asheton, here seen in November 2003 at Tower Records in Manhattan has died. Read the NME obituary here.

4 comments :

Music Fan said...

this is such a sad way to start 2009. he will be sorely missed. one of the great/influential guitar players ever. there's no punk movement without those stooges riffs. RIP Ron.

azfad said...

Outstanding guitarist in one of the greatest bands ever - RIP

swac said...

I just read a follow-up story in which Asheton's family had to call in police to stop his assistant from absconding with his guitar collection. Sad postscript to and already sad story.

andy said...

Most rock deaths have no effect on me - didn't know 'em aint gonna grieve now" thang. This one, though, really hit me.

I've been a Stooges fan since 1978 when I bough their first album. I liked it well enough, though it didn't pack the punch that Never Mind The Bollocks had, Then I was given Funhouse to listen to. "The heaviest record ever made" was his estimation. By the end of the solo of the third number -T.V.Eye - he had my total agreement. This record was a monster of heavy dread so thick you could choke. Is there a moment on any record as downright meat-chompingly heavy as TV Eye? Who on earth could write sucha' piece of music in 1970? The Man could. Ron Asheton could. He stood right up to your face and dared you to diss his playing as primitive, repetitive, tribal and deranged. He took everything that should by all rights have been drawbacks in guitar styling and made his own inimitable style from them.

I met Ron when he toured Australia with his band Dark Carnival. For me this was like meeting Hendrix - Ron's guitar work, particularly on Funhouse has been the primary influence on my guitar playing and remains a landmark of total take it to the edge and right on over rifferama heaven.

In person he was a soft-spoken and totally lacking in any rock star pretensions. He talked to all and any and was as funny as all shit remembering how Bowie grabbed his arse one day at the studio and how all-American straight guy Ron's reaction of "gotta keep it cool but what the f%$^$%" look of horror!

Getting to see the Stooges perform Funhouse was one of the highlights of a very long gig-going life. It was also great to see the Asheton Bros getting some payback for the huge influence they had on so many players.

It took history to catch up with Ron's playing, not the other way round. He finally got his dues and was able to lap up the applause and the well-earned dollars. God bless him for the endless hours of enjoyment he brought into my life.

Thanks Ron, the world caught up in the end

Andy