Patrick McGoohan Dead at 80


Patrick McGoohan . . . best known to prior generations as John Drake and/or Number Six . . . passed away on Tuesday at the age of 80.

Here is a broader account from today's Los Angeles Times

18 comments:

Flickhead said...

"Prior generations"...OUCH!

pinstripebindi said...

Be seeing you.

swac said...

Damn, you beat me to it, pinstripe.

If only I could remember some dialogue from Dr. Syn about fighting tyranny.

Richard Gibson said...

Very sad.

Peter Nellhaus said...

And I just read that Ricardo Montalban has also shuffled off this moral coil.

swac said...

Just heard about Ricardo a short while ago.

Maybe I should take a break from work and post something...

Ivan G. Shreve, Jr. said...

One hell of an actor. 'Nuff said.

Mick said...

Yes, indeed. Be seeing you.

andrew said...

A talented guy with charm to boot. Will definitely be missed.

- Andrew

Mark said...

When I was in high school in the 1970s I watched, for the first time, all 17 episodes of The Prisoner when it was rebroadcast on TV Ontario, a government sponsored channel. Each episode was introduced by journalist Warner Troyer, and after all 17 had been broadcast, the run was wrapped up with a lengthy interview that Troyer conducted with McGoohan. I had not seen that interview since then, but this evening discovered it in four parts on YouTube. The sad news of McGoohan's passing had led me to rediscovering this wonderful piece.

Here's a link to Part 1.

Vanwall said...

I was totally hooked when I saw The Prisoner on its initial release, and I never failed to watch another McGoohan effort, past or present. A real genius, and one of the few other actors to get the Orson Welles free hand - The Prisoner was an individualist's manifesto by Patrick McGoohan, down to the music, costumes, and the lettering on the signs. I'll sure miss 'im.

Tom Sutpen said...

My Friend Flickhead:

"Prior generations"...OUCH!

Hey, it was either that or 'Old and not-as-old geezers like me'. I was but a mere toddler when 'The Prisoner' first aired, after all.

Mark:

I'd not seen that interview before. Thanks for posting the link.

Rob:

Well put. Last thing I saw Patrick McGoohan in was a few months back when I saw, for the second time, Basil Dearden's All Night Long. Not as good a film as it could have been ('Othello' in a Jazz club setting), but McGoohan was phenomenal. While watching it, however, I realized that he had the strangest way of commanding the screen (big or small) by seeming to physically draw back from a scene ever so slightly; as if he were prepared to make a break for it and run out the back at a second's notice. It's often barely perceptible, but it;s there. While other actors as flamboyant and/or eccentric as he pushed themselves forward, almost bullying their way into the moment, he riveted the attention by reversing the process just a bit. I'm not saying this was the only technique he brought to the proceedings; it's merely one of the more striking (and little remarked upon).

Flynn D said...

As a fan of the old Columbo series, Patrick McGoohan's three appearances were arguably among the best in that show's long run. His turn as master spy Nelson Brenner was the most memorable villain of them all.

Flickhead said...

Well, Tom, I'm gonna go shuffle off in my walker over on yonder to Netflix and put The Three Lives of Thomasina on my queue... if I can remember my dern glasses... oh, here they are right on my head... hope I don't break my hip along the way... geez, where'd I put my teeth...?

Flickhead said...

Pulse-pounding McGoohan tuneage: the theme from Danger Man, which has rattled around my head for decades.

swac said...

The funny thing is, I had just finished perusing Tim Lucas's reappraisal of the viewing order for The Prisoner episodes in Video Watchdog when I was informed that McGoohan had passed. Curious.

BTW...if you ever find yourself in North Wales, I highly recommend visiting The Village in Portmeirion, it looks exactly the same as when they filmed the show. I spent a day there and couldn't have been happier. Mostly because I escaped.

Peter L. Winkler said...

As much as I like McGoohan and The Prisoner, I think the cult surrounding it has credited McGoohan with creating just about everything notable in the series is mistaken.

Here's a very interesting interview with George Markstein, who I think deserves credit for creating the show.

http://www.the-prisoner-6.freeserve.co.uk/markstein.htm

Steven Augustine said...

If you want to *download* that YouTube interview with McGoohan, use this:

http://www.dvdvideosoft.com/free-dvd-video-software.htm