The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Welcome to Show Business! #10


Original Caption:

Los Angeles -- Marie Prevost and Chester Conklin, members of the old Keystone Comedy Troupe, are making a comeback as they step before the kleig lights once again. They are in a short subject called "Keystone Hotel." (1935)

5 comments :

Robert Fiore said...

She looks fine here, but did not look her best when the cops busted in on her lonely nest. More humor comes to mind, but it's all horribly, horribly cruel.

Hans Gruber said...

Lovely tale, bob.

Tom Sutpen said...

It's at least a cautionary tale for dog-owners (never croak without first insuring that your pup is well-fed beforehand)

VP81955 said...

That year (1935), Marie portrayed one of Carole Lombard's friends in "Hands Across The Table."

A few months ago, I wrote an entry on her career and separated fact from Nick Lowe fiction (and that's no knock at him -- "Pure Pop For Now People" is one of my favorite albums of the '70s):

http://community.livejournal.com/carole_and_co/102936.html

(the end is "102936.html")

Tom Sutpen said...

Excellent post. I should point out one thing, though: Most of the details in Nick Lowe's song are not in Kenneth Anger's account (an account that occupies just a sentence or two of 'Hollywood Babylon'). You could say Lowe was wildly embellishing an already dubious story.

And yes, 'Pure Pop for Now People' is, and always will be, a thing of beauty.