The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

The Art of Travel #19

11 comments :

Feta said...

The irony is staggering...

Richard Gibson said...

Incredible image.

Anyone seen the cover of 'Towering Toccata' by Lalo Schifrin?

I have set to see 'Man on a Wire' but will, I hope soon.

Kreisler said...

Is this actually Pakistan airlines?!

estiv said...

Wow. Talk about changing context altering the meaning of a signifier.

Ryland Walker Knight said...

ummm

R.H. said...

I've flown Pakistan Air. (PIA)

Jonathan Lee said...

too soon

neuroglyphix said...

When, I say, when?

What year was this image made?

Corey Taché said...

This reminds me of the sweatshirt I saw a young woman wearing recently featuring an illustration of the Challenger flying among the stars. I asked her where she got it and she mumbled something about finding it in a thrift store. I asked if she remembered the Challenger and she said she just thought the shirt looked cool.

It's like a travel brochure from the twenties advertising a relaxing spa in sunny Birkenau.

Patrick Ciccone said...

Does anyone have the link for a site with images of the World Trade Center destroyed in comic book form--I'm remembering one that featured something like ten different comic panels, as early as 1975 or so, with the towers destroyed. Google wades through a sea of WTC images, so I'm afraid I lost it.

Brickles said...

The illustration was part of an advert published in Le Point - 19 Mars 1979.