The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Great Madmen of the 20th Century #32


Timothy Carey

12 comments :

Fred said...

"I don't want to die..."

His performance in Paths of Glory is absolutely unforgettable. Great picture.

SomeNYGuy said...

I'm still not convinced he was really an actor, but rather a freakish exhibitionist who could be exploited effectively by a resourceful director. (Yeah, I suppose you could say that about a lot of actors...)

Lex10 said...

Yeah, like Kinski

Vanwall said...

In "Paths of Glory", he was relatively subdued, and his restrained face carried him thru many of the scenes where he normally would've been sketchy at best. But in so many other films he was in, he was so obviously out of control in his own little reality, that it was downright scary. I find it interesting that Kubrik, the control freak, loved his work, and it may have been that Carey was so intensely his own person that Stanley appreciated that kind truth to oneself. No one will ever be like him, that's for sure.

Dr. Mystery said...

I can't think of another human being, alive or dead, who could have been able to fit so well with both Kubrick and Cassavetes, as well as providing an excellent cameo in "D.C. Cab."

Tom Sutpen said...

And while we're on the subject, let us not forget the most insane labor of love in the history of film, Carey's directorial debut The World's Greatest Sinner

swac said...

I just watched Crime Wave, directed by Andre de Toth, with both Sterling Hayden and T.C., it's a pretty safe bet that Kubrick saw the film and cast both of them as a result in The Killing (not to mention borrowed some of its tone).

hc said...

Carey was always interesting, always scarey. Zappa was hired to score World's greatest sinner in 1962?!?
Had Carey taken the part in Res Dogs, somebody would have died--Carey, Lawrence Tierney or Tarantino.

James B Harris (speaking of Kubrick) put Carey in Fast Walking, which is a pretty amazing picture, with one stunning drug speech by the late Tim McIntire

Flickhead said...

Just as a footnote, Carey and Joe Turkel (the bartender in The Shining) played together in The Killing, Paths of Glory and then The Boy and the Pirates (1960), a kiddie fantasy concocted by Bert I. Gordon ("Mr. B.I.G."). Carey's fairly restrained as a pirate who spends most of his screen time laughing heartily at unfunny jokes. Turkel plays a tiny genie, complete with upended, pointy-toed genie shoes. The star of The Boy and the Pirates was 12-year-old Charles Herbert, who crashed and burned as a drug addict but eventually got clean in 2005, with help from Paul (Donna Reed Show) Peterson's child star rehab facility, A Minor Consideration.

Sam said...

I thought he was great in "Head". "Atta Boy, Mike!"

-K- said...

I too saw him in "Crime Wave" a few weeks ago and he was great. "Crime Wave" itself is a film noir that I had never heard of much less saw. Great film noir, shot entirely on the streets of Los Angeles. Don't forget to listen to James Ellroy's commentary. It's fantastic. He probably was as crazy as Carey.

darkcitydame4e said...

Being a "filmnoirfanatic" I really enjoyed, actor Timothy Carey (TC) performances in DeToth's "Crime Wave" and Kubrick's "The Killing."
His screen time wasn't long, but "memorable." I too, enjoyed listening to authors James Ellroy and Eddie Muller's commentaries on the dvd "Crime Wave"..."Funny!"