The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

(Wo)men of God #5


Aimee Semple McPherson

9 comments :

Brent McKee said...

The Canadian journalist, author and general curmudgeon Gordon Sinclair (ask Cooke - he might be old enough to remember him from Front Page Challenge) was one of Aimee Semple McPherson's lovers. One time Aimee's son was on Front Page Challenge (which was a panel show sort of like I've Got A Secret or What's My Line? where the panelists had to guess a headline by questioning guests and then interviewed them afterwards) and made the assertion that his mother never drank. Sinclair informed him that Aimee did in fact drink and he knew because the two of them drained more than one bottle together.

Vanwall said...

A Whore For Christ. In more ways than one.

swac said...

I've heard the Sinclair story, he was quite a guy.

I loved Front Page Challenge, the Malcolm X episode was noteworthy, and I'd gladly watch reruns. Too bad History Channel doesn't show it.

(I even have a set of Front Page Challenge drinking glasses...including one with an image of the very paper I work for on it.)

Tom Sutpen said...

Sister Aimee's exploits (if not all the details of them) were a more or less open matter after her 'kidnapping' in the mid 20s. I doubt if anyone, except perhaps for the most fervent attendees at the Angelus Temple, had many illusions about her after that. Like all the best evangelists (from Billy Sunday to Jimmy Lee) she was, at heart, an entertainer, and a damn good whore for Christ.

shahn said...

I'd love to see Herman Mankiewicz's script about her filmed someday....

swac said...

Oh well, there's always The Miracle Woman.

Mr DeBakey said...

She [Ms McPherson] made a fictional appearance in a nifty little TV seies called
The Hollywood Detective.

Said detective was played by Tony Peck, a certain more famous Peck's son.

1989?

swac said...

There's a recent film about her surfacing on DVD in the coming weeks, but it looks like a hack job from appearances.

I'd like to see the '70s TV movie about her disappearance, starring Faye Dunaway as Aimee and Bette Davis as her mom.

For now, I'll stick with last year's American Experience doc.

SomeNYGuy said...

Kathy Lee Gifford has written a musical about her. I don't think she intends to play the role herself, but you never know. Be afraid! Be very afraid!