The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Annals of Crime #11
Friends and Family #23
Great Moments in Journalism #7


Original caption:

Star's Home in Murder Spotlight.

Beverly Hills -- Newsmen and the Coroner's wagon converge outside the Beverly Hills home of actress Lana Turner, where Johnny Stompanato, known underworld character, was stabbed to death in the star's bedroom last night. Police are holding Miss Turner's 14 year old daughter, Cheryl Crane, on the basis of her story that she stabbed Stompanato to save her mother's life. (1958)

4 comments :

houhai said...

http://www.granta.com/extracts/2144

houhai said...

Eric Root, a friend who claims Lana asked him to tell everyone that she killed Stompanato, has a story in his memoir about Turner's perfume. She wore Tuberose by Mary Chess, a scent Cheryl Crane also remembers being something of a signature with her mother. The perfume was first sold in 1930, and by the time Root met Turner in 1971, it was rather hard to come by. He did some research and arranged for several bottles to be sent to her from New York. Lana, he says, wouldn't stand for any other smell in the house. If you came to visit you were not allowed to wear perfume or aftershave (unless it was a tiny dose of Old Spice, which her great love Tyrone Power used to wear). So one day Root came sprinkled with something he thought she would like. 'What in the hell is that god-awful stuff you have on?' she reportedly asked before he was even in the door. Root was ordered to have a shower and let the maid wash his clothes before he could stay. He did as he was told, and once he was clean he answered his hostess's question: 'That was Tuberose, by Mary Chess.' Turner didn't question the reason behind his transgression, or over-identification. She simply put her foot down: 'No one wears that around here but me. Got it?'

from above Granta article by Gaby Wood

Tom Sutpen said...

Thanks for posting that (I can never get enough of old scandal slop). Are you, by any chance, the author of that article?

houhai said...

alas, no, i'm not gaby wood. i worked at the new york review of books for two summers though.