The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Joints #2


CBGB's owner Hilly Kristal (who passed away earlier this week at the age of 75) sweeps up after what could have been an average or a legendary night.

Seminal Image #725


Hijosen no onna
(Dragnet Girl)
(Yasujiro Ozu; 1933)

They Were Collaborators #358


Edie Sedgwick, Gerard Malanga and The Velvet Undergound

Artists in Action #249


Norman Mailer takes a swing at nothing

The Ink & Paint Set #22


Martha Raye in The Autograph Hound
(Jack King, Disney, 1939)

The Art of Jazz #43


Shirley
(Shirley Bassey)
(Columbia/EMI; 1961)

Collect 'Em All #35


Norman Foster
No. 20 in a series of 50 from Player's Navy Cut Cigarettes

Born in Richmond, Indiana, on December 13th, 1900, Norman Foster started his career as a newspaper reporter in his native town. Later, going to New York for a better position, he turned to the stage instead, and after a hard struggle, gradually won the position of a popular leading man. He had his first leading film role in Gentlemen of the Press, a talking made at Long Island. Later he was given a Hollywood contract. Among his recent films are State Fair, Orient Express and Strictly Dynamite. His real name is John Hoeffer and he is married to Claudette Colbert.

P Is For Pulp #20


The Tiger in Summer
(by Michael Keon)
(Popular Library; 1954)

Similar Images #6


Can You Take It
(Dave Fleischer; 1934)


La Belle et le Bete
(Jean Cocteau; 1946)

The Friends of Milt Hinton #4


Gene Krupa plays in New York City in 1955.

A Is For Arbus #42


Susan Sontag and her son David (July 1965)

When Legends Gather #290


Martin Sheen and Ava Gardner (and the poor shlub who has to drive them)

C is for Cunningham #8


Sydney at Davenport (1964)

Artists in Action #248


Truman Capote keeps his feet off the floor

The Art of Feminism #6

The Neocons #7


Norman Podhoretz

Broadcasters #24


Art Laboe

The Native-Americana of Edward S. Curtis #8


Hesquiaht woman from the Central Nootka tribe; British Columbia (1916)

The Cool Hall of Fame #94


Chick Webb

The Art of Cinema #251


The Informer
(John Ford; 1935)

Art of the London Underground #23


Untitled
By J. Hassall; 1908

Through the Lens of Cyril Arapoff #11


A second-hand bookstall. During the 1930's this street market became a mecca for bargain-hunters and antique collectors.

From the Sketch Book of Lawson Wood #18


A story without words

From the Southern Travellers Handbook for 1965/66 #6


First-Class passengers

Although comfortable enough, there is little sociability in a first-class carriage on a railway; everybody seems to have an idea that he is the only one who is really entitled, by payment and position, to a seat therein, and so is afraid of compromising his dignity by speaking. There is consequently no conversation: the heads of the four corner occupants are usually looking out of the windows, and the centre ones look at each other.

Seminal Image #724


Hard Luck
(Buster Keaton, Edward F. Cline; 1921)

The Art of Cinema #250


Aelita: Queen of Mars
(Yakov Protazanov; 1924)

Artists in Action #247


Louis B. Mayer presents a flag to Lon Chaney during filming of Tell It to the Marines.

They Were Collaborators #357


Ginger Rogers, Irving Berlin and Fred Astaire.

Seminal Image #723


The Asphalt Jungle
(John Huston; 1950)

Fun at Bohemian Grove #24


Bohemians feast (1904)

Newspapermen #18


John Reed

The Art of Cinema #249


Ascenseur pour l'échafaud
(Elevator to the Gallows)
(Louis Malle; 1958)

P is for Pulp #18


Famous Fantastic Mysteries
(May-June, 1940)

The Art of the Big Top #11

They Were Collaborators #356


Miles Davis and Bill Evans

Poets are both clean and warm
And most are far above the norm
Whether here or on the roam
Have a poet in every home! #22


Vladimir Mayakovsky

The Art of the Gig #9

They Were an Item #12


Buddy Rogers and Mary Pickford tie the knot.

Collect 'Em All #34


Douglas Fairbanks
No. 19 in a series of 50 from Player's Navy Cut Cigarettes

"Born on May 23rd, 1883 in Denver, Colorado, Douglas Fairbanks studied to become a mining engineer, but changed his mind and went on the stage, leaving in 1915 for screen work. He soon won stardom, becoming famous for his vigourous personality and acrobatic feats upon the screen. Perhaps his most famous silent film was Robin Hood. His talkies include Mr. Robinson Crusoe and The Private Life of Don Juan. In 1920 he married Mary Pickford. Douglas Fairbanks Jr. is his son by his first wife. His brother Robert manages his business affairs."

Adventures in American Filmmaking #81


Today's Adventure: Leslie Howard, Basil Rathbone and John Barrymore confer on the set of George Cukor's 1936 production of Romeo and Juliet. Norma Shearer is nowhere to be seen.

Seminal Image #722


Desperate Journey
(Raoul Walsh; 1942)

The Cool Hall of Fame #93


Porter Wagoner

They Were Collaborators #355


Nelson Riddle, Eva Marie Saint and Paul Newman

The Golden Age of Prurience #42


I Feel It Coming
(Sidney Knight; 1969)

Before and After #83:
Benny Goodman

Before


After

They Were an Item #11


Olive Thomas and Jack Pickford

Seminal Image #721


The Red Badge of Courage
(John Huston; 1951)

Artists in Action #246