The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

The Women #6


Mary Brian
from The New Movie Album: An Autographed Who's Who of the Screen (1931)

"I was so discouraged during my early days in Hollywood that I almost lost confidence in myself and the steadfast belief that I could succeed in motion pictures which had brought mother and me from Dallas, Texas. At first the rebuffs didn't mean much to me. I had expected that it would be hard to get a chance, but day after day it was the same story. Nothing to do. And then I was given an opportunity to appear in a prologue at a Los Angeles theatre. The director of the prologue, believing I had ability, gave me a letter to Herbert Brenon who was then preapring to direct "Peter Pan" for Paramount. The casting director told me that I was so young that he thought I might be able to land a minor part in the picture, but when Herbert Brenon got back from New York he said, 'Oh no. No minor roles for this girl. I believe that she is suited for the part of Wendy.' He took me at once to see Jesse L. Lasky. My knees were shaking, but Mr. Lasky was very kind to me and that helped a lot. I was given a screen test and two days later Mr. Brenon called me and told me the part was mine. I was placed under contract by Paramount. I was born in Corsicana, Texas and when I was still a little girl my family moved to Dallas. My favourite parts have been in 'Peter Pan,' 'Knockout Reilly,' and 'Brown of Harvard.'"

2 comments :

Anonymous said...

I spent an afternoon with her once, she'd agreed to an interview. A very, very sweet woman, then in her 80s. A sweet, romantic female of a sort I'm afraid they don't make much any more. She was a very talented amateur painter, mostly portraits and had them hanging in the house, one of Conrad Hilton, one of Glenda Farrell, and one of her husband, George Tomasini, the editor of Hitchcock's pictures. He had been dead many many years but the moment she spoke of him in passing she began to weep. Ah, Mary Brian, lovely lady.

swac said...

Wow, that's incredible.

Thanks for sharing.