The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

Seminal Image #314


Dr. Strangelove; or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
(Stanley Kubrick; 1964)

3 comments :

Vanwall said...

Slim's happy warrior, Major Kong, stole the movie, IMHO - a remarkable feat, considering the concentration of pure comic genius involved. There is no way Sellers, even with his talent, could've done it better than Pickens, with his incandescent slice of pure Southern shit-kicker drawl and his immense physicality. Kubrick made an inspired choice there, one of many for this film. This may have been the blackest view of American ideals ever.

BCNU

Brent McKee said...

I totally agree about Pickens, it was the coming together of the right man with the right role and should have been rewarded more than it was. It was a pure example of serendipity that he got the parts as well, with Sellers injuring himself so that he couldn't play Kong. Having Sellers in the role would have diminished the part and diminished the movie.

Vanwall said...

I call it the "Gold Hat" phenomenon - in the public's mind, a minor role becomes the visual or aural representation of the entire film - ala Alfonso Bedoya's awesome bandito's famous "bodges..." line is the the thing most folks remember about "Treasure of the Sierra Madre", so do most seem to remember Mjr. Kong whoopin' it up on the falling bomb. Both films had some of the best acting ever, and crackerjack scripts, but the quirky fat guy gets the telling part - like Thomas Gomez in "Ride the Pink Horse", another serendipitous role.

BCNU