The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

They Were Collaborators #53:
Holiday Weekend Edition


Bette Davis and Joan Blondell in 1932, around the time they appeared in Three on a Match.

I'll take this Bette and Joan over Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? anyday...

3 comments :

Ivan G. said...

I'll take this Bette and Joan over Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? anyday...

I second that emotion--Joanie was quite a dish in those days. For years I refused to believe she was the same actress in Here Come the Brides (1968-70).

slyboots2 said...

That was actually a pretty fun movie? Tell me- was it considered A or B at the time? I have a really hard time telling sans context. (my guess is quality B) Thanks!

swac said...

Well, it's a Warner Bros. pre-code, but with three rising female stars (Ann Dvorak is the third) and directed by Mervyn LeRoy, so I'd say for that studio, at that time, it was probably an A-picture.