The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

The Roots of Pop Art #5


Mopsy
(#1; 1948)

3 comments :

Rob said...

Ah, Mopsy! Gladys Parker was such a unique artist, and Mopsy was based on her own looks! She must've been a cutie. Her style was never less than fluid, and she was really careful with composition. I really loved those "flapper comics" from her early days, and Ethel Hay's work as well - they were all a bit racy, to boot! Wonder if they've ever been collected into a hardback?

BCNU

Tom Sutpen said...

I don't know if they've ever been published in book form, but I'd love to find some of that flapper art from the 20s. I've got a few images; nothing to build a series around, unfortunately.

Rob said...

Dixie Dugan, the Brooksie inspired flapper, was one of my faves. The whole era had some snappy visuals, it would be a real shame if there isn't something done in the near future.

BCNU