The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

El Cine Del Oro #6


Comicos de la Legua (Strolling Players)
(Fernando Cortes 1956)

4 comments :

Rob said...

Ah, a sublime example of the brilliance of Cine de Oro caricature! Wonderfully evocotive of the stars and what to expect.
Another interesting fact regarding Mexican Cinema during this period - it was really hoppin'! They were cranking out films like there was no tomorrow, with a tremendous output, and the posters were just as hot. Like Bollywood on amphetamines for a while there.

BCNU

swac said...

Too bad someone couldn't do a Kevin Brownlow-esque documentary on Mexican cinema...especially while some of these figures are still alive (as is Fernando Cortes, if the IMDb is anything to go by).

Tom Sutpen said...

Stephen wrote:

Too bad someone couldn't do a Kevin Brownlow-esque documentary on Mexican cinema...especially while some of these figures are still alive (as is Fernando Cortes, if the IMDb is anything to go by).

*****
Unfortunately, the prevailing view of Mexican Cinema (and this is even true of cinephiles who ought to know better) is dominated by Masked Wrestlers, Cantinflas and Aztec Wimmens pulling each other's hair out in the corrida.

Who's gonna put money into sich a project if they're carrying around that bunch of stereotypes.

Rob said...

Yes,it's a shame that most people immediately think of Santo, or El Demonio Azul, (still my favorite Enmascaradoro name), or one of the skidillion other wrestlers, when they hear the words "Mexican Movie" uttered. I have a hard time watching those Luchadores movies myself, as they aren't well shot, written, or acted, but they are like WWF to a huge segment of humanity south of the Border and beyond.

La Epoca de Oro was a sadly short period, but produced some wonderful examples of films that poured out the dreams of Mexico on the screen, in a very un-Hollywood way. They literaly changed society for a while, with the somewhat anachronistic charro image being a badge of cultural identity for a time.

I think many were as visually brilliant as anything out of Hollywood or Europe, and the best were almost like Murnau films - you could follow the storyline like a good silent, something that came in handy for one like me: no habla, mijo.

And don't forget the breakout films that came soon after - with heavy emphasis on sex and violence, at a time when the US was still making some pretty tame pablum. It was a whole 'nother world, down Mexico way.

Adios, and BCNU