This Week's Hopper #1


Two on the Aisle (1927)

4 comments:

swac said...

Love love love Hopper. I once saw an exhibit about Hitchcock and Art, and they showed several pieces of painting and sculpture that influenced his films, including several Hoppers. The house in Psycho is pretty much a direct copy of a Hopper painting.

Hitchcock was also a big Rodin fan, he frequently posed his actors like his sculptures, and there were also the original Dali illustrations for Spellbound. A glass case held the original head of the mummified mommy from Psycho (a lot of Hitchcock's stuff went to the Cinemateque Francais, which co produced the exhibit with the Musee des Beaux Arts in Montreal), and the very last room held a giant monkey bars with fake crows all over it, while the walls were covered with Hitchcock movie posters from around the world. Damnedest thing I ever saw in an art gallery (aside from my mom attempting to pick up a Brillo box at the National Gallery in Washington and setting off the alarm).

Tom Sutpen said...

Stephen recounted:

Damnedest thing I ever saw in an art gallery (aside from my mom attempting to pick up a Brillo box at the National Gallery in Washington and setting off the alarm).

*****
Something tells me Warhol would have approved mightily.

swac said...

Reminds me of that time Warhol was on the Love Boat, and runs into Tom Bosley and Marion Ross from Happy Days. Would've been just like that.

Got a pic from that you can post?

Tom Sutpen said...

Stephen asked:

Reminds me of that time Warhol was on the Love Boat, and runs into Tom Bosley and Marion Ross from Happy Days. Would've been just like that.

Got a pic from that you can post?

*****
Wish I did. I've never seen that, but I've heard varying accounts where Warhol either handled it more or les without embarassing himself (would he have been capable of embarassment after all those years?), or they could have sent a mannequin with a silver wig in there to do the job with equal facility.

Why do I think it's probably both?