The Explanation
(for those who require one)

And, of course, that is what all of this is -- all of this: the one song, ever changing, ever reincarnated, that speaks somehow from and to and for that which is ineffable within us and without us, that is both prayer and deliverance, folly and wisdom, that inspires us to dance or smile or simply to go on, senselessly, incomprehensibly, beatifically, in the face of mortality and the truth that our lives are more ill-writ, ill-rhymed and fleeting than any song, except perhaps those songs -- that song, endlesly reincarnated -- born of that truth, be it the moon and June of that truth, or the wordless blue moan, or the rotgut or the elegant poetry of it. That nameless black-hulled ship of Ulysses, that long black train, that Terraplane, that mystery train, that Rocket '88', that Buick 6 -- same journey, same miracle, same end and endlessness."
-- Nick Tosches, Where Dead Voices Gather

People Who Died #13


Lupe Velez, The Mexican Spitfire (1908-1944)

4 comments :

Rob said...

I tried to explain the whole "Mexican Spitfire" mystique to a friend once, and I ended up just telling him he'd have to see one to understand, even though I didn't particularly care for 'em myself. Lupe was a hot li'l number when she was young, tho.

BCNU

swac said...

Somewhere I've got a comic book version of how she apparently died, although I understand the facts are cribbed from Kenneth Anger. It's a '70s underground comic that unfortunately also sticks to a lot of the old Roscoe Arbuckle myths as well.

But a quick scan of her photos confirms that she was a breathtaking beauty.

Tom Sutpen said...

Stephen wrote:

Somewhere I've got a comic book version of how she apparently died, although I understand the facts are cribbed from Kenneth Anger.

*****
I thought Anger's was the comic book version.

It's a '70s underground comic that unfortunately also sticks to a lot of the old Roscoe Arbuckle myths as well.

*****
Speaking of Anger (and anger), when I had occasion to read "Hollywood Babylon" again a few years back, I actually was offended by how gleefully inaccurate the chapter on Arbuckle was. It's like he actually believed Arbuckle had done everything the Hearst press had accused him of that weekend at the St. Francis Hotel.

And to think much of that book originally appeared in the hallowed pages of "Cahiers du cinema"

Rob said...

Warhol's version of her death with Sedgwick as Lupe was pretty eerie. I understand the Velvets danced onstage at a showing. How Hollywood is that, a Busby Berkeley tribute during a movie showing how well it ate its young.

BCNU